Hair loss is an everyday occurrence for all of us, and we can each lose as much as 50 to 100 hairs per day. When we’re losing more than 100 hairs a day, however, then it enters the range of excessive hair loss and treatment options may need to be explored. 

The hair growth process

At any time of the day, 90% of the hair on our scalp is growing, but it’s not all necessarily in the same life cycle. Each hair follicle has its own life cycle which is divided into three phases:

  • Anagen – This is active hair growth that lasts between two and eight years.
  • Catagen – This is transitional hair growth that only lasts two to three weeks.
  • Telogen – This is the resting phase that lasts two to three months. After this, the hair sheds and is replaced by new hair. 

As people age, the rate of hair growth slows down. Outside of the hair growth phases, conditions exist that will lead to excessive shedding and hair loss. Here is a look at some of the more common conditions people encounter. 

1. Androgenetic Alopecia

Causes

Androgenetic alopecia more commonly referred to as male- or female-pattern baldness, and it is one of the most common reasons for hair loss. The cause of this particular hair loss condition is genetics, with men suffering from androgenetic alopecia as early as their teens, while women tend to experience it in their 40s or later. It is believed that hormones play a role in the condition as well as genes. 

Symptoms

Men suffering from male-pattern baldness generally lose hair at the temples and crown of the head, resulting in a receding hairline. Women with female-pattern baldness generally experience this when menopause begins, resulting in general thinning over the scalp, particularly at the crown. 

2. Alopecia areata

Causes 

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition which, unlike androgenetic alopecia, causes the hair to fall out all of a sudden, rather than overtime. If you’re suffering from alopecia areata, your immune system effectively attacks your healthy body parts, including your hair follicles.

Symptoms

The hair on the scalp, as well as the face, will begin to fall out in chunks. It can be quite patchy at first, getting more pronounced over time. 

3. Involutional alopecia

Causes

This is another form of alopecia whereby hair follicles go into the resting phase (telogen) and the remaining hairs become shorter and begin to shed. 

Symptoms

Involutional alopecia is a natural condition whereby the hair gradually thins with age. 

4. Telogen effluvium

Causes 

There are many reasons why telogen effluvium will be stimulated in an individual. These include:

  • Severe stress
  • Surgery
  • Childbirth
  • Extreme weight loss
  • Thyroid conditions
  • Certain medications

Symptoms

If you’re suffering from telogen effluvium your hair remains in the telogen phase of the growth cycle, resulting in it falling out. This is most often a temporary condition that will resolve itself in time.

5. Anagen effluvium

Causes

Similar to telogen effluvium, anagen effluvium can be stimulated by a variety of factors including:

  • Chemotherapy (cancer treatment)
  • Radiation
  • Fungal infections
  • Autoimmune diseases

Symptoms

A person suffering from anagen effluvium will experience large patches of hair falling out on the scalp and face. This is when the hair falls out during the growth phase (anagen) of the hair’s life cycle.

6. Hormonal imbalance

Causes

Hair loss as a result of hormonal imbalance could be caused by polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) which is when a woman has cysts on her ovaries, sometimes accompanied by hair loss. When stopping certain birth control pills, women can also experience a temporary hormonal imbalance that results in hair loss. 

Symptoms

Women who suffer from such hormonal imbalances can experience thinning of hair on their scalp.

7. Scalp psoriasis

Causes

There is no clear cause for scalp psoriasis, but doctors believe it’s connected with the immune system whereby skin cells grow too quickly and build up into patches. 

Symptoms

Scalp psoriasis results in raised, red, often scaly patches on the scalp, forehead, back of the neck, behind and inside the ears. When it appears, it can impact the growth of hair in those patches. 

8. Thyroid disorders

Causes

Thyroid disorders affect the thyroid gland which is located in the front of the neck. The thyroid regulates various metabolic processes throughout the body, and there is a range of thyroid disorders that can affect its structure or function.

Symptoms

If you have a problem with your thyroid, you may experience a thinning of the hair, or it can even fall out in clumps when it is brushed. 

Hair loss treatments and solutions

A number of hair loss conditions will eventually right themselves over time, or can be treated medically. However, in cases where the hair loss or thinning is permanent, there are a number of incredible hair solutions offered by the specialists at Hair to Ware. Some of these include: 

At Hair to Ware hair clinic, our specialists work closely with every client to ensure they are offered a workable hair solution customised to their unique needs and preferences. We understand the personal value that a quality hair care solution can provide to the individual.